Tag Archives: tufted titmouse

A few fall yard birds

The year-round residents are getting into their winter groups and the winter residents like the juncos are here in abundance. Generally, at this time of year, I would be at the Wakarusa Wetlands four or more mornings a week. I know I am one of many deeply grieving this loss. I hope that those of us who are doing more feeding, putting up more cover, winter roosting boxes, and brush piles, can offset some of the habitat loss these birds are experiencing. Support the work the Haskell Students are doing here: https://www.facebook.com/wetlandspreservationorganization Click on pictures to enlarge.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

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A morning of cardinals

I love the big groups of cardinals at this time of year. With many predators visiting our yard over the last few weeks, I am not seeing the big numbers of small birds that we usually see. For instance, I haven’t seen many mourning doves since I discovered three piles of mourning dove feathers in the yard over several days.  I would stay away from this yard, too! What I can always count on are the big groups of cardinals that visit the feeders and water at dawn and dusk. A few nights ago, I counted eighteen at the feeders. Today, I was raking leaves and I guess a human being out there keeping the predators away made them feel a little safer. More cardinals, more chickadees, more titmice, and even a brown creeper. I do hope the mourning doves come back soon. Click on pictures to enlarge.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

 

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

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Occupy the Wakarusa Wetlands

Every picture I post this week will be from the area of the Wakarusa Wetlands that will be obliterated by the SLT. I have hundreds of pictures of hundreds of species who will be displaced and/or killed by greed and indifference.

This will be gone.

Click on pictures to enlarge.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

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Cooper’s hawk visit

Every once in a while, a Cooper’s hawk comes to visit. While I am sure the little birds would not appreciate this humor, we do, in one way or another, feed everyone at our house. Click on pictures to enlarge.

© Chris Taylor

Nervous robin waits to see if it is safe to take a bath.

© Chris Taylor

Young house sparrows hide in the thicket until parents give the “all clear.”

© Chris Taylor

The titmice don’t mind. Fierce.

© Chris Taylor

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Yellow-bellied sapsucker and other backyard visitors

Now that we have the feeders up, our list of backyard visitors is incredible. Click on pictures to enlarge.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

 

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

 

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

 

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Snow days

We finally got our big snow. I know–it’s relative. We didn’t get nearly what others have. I never did hear what we ended up with, but my guess is less than a foot. It’s mighty cold with the wind blowing! An arctic blast is on the way. I’ve filled all the feeders and made some tasty vegan suet for the Carolina wrens. My thoughts are with them over the next few very cold days. Click on pictures to enlarge.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

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Winter visitors

It’s always great to see all the visitors to the feeders at this time of year. Click on pictures to enlarge.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

A great way to help birds this winter is to create a brush pile. It’s a good place to keep warm and hide from predators.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

Nuthatches seem to do pretty much everything upside down.

© Chris Taylor

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