Sometimes, cloudy days are the best

It was incredibly bleak and cloudy yesterday, but still a wonderful time for making a lap around the lake. Sometimes, these cloudy days when no one is around are the best.

First, we met some cedar waxwings chowing down on berries.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

There were numerous pelicans on the water and turkeys foraging the fields.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

A heron rookery we visited last year was very active. It looks like some of the herons might already be incubating eggs.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

We met an amazing Canada goose. He looks like he took a bath in white paint up to his neck. This is called “leucism,” It is not harmful, just reduced pigmentation.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

We saw snow geese and Ross’s geese.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

An beautiful group of deer posed for a shot before taking off for the woods.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

My favorite part of the day was watching a group of snow geese (Canada geese, blue geese, greater white-fronted geese, and Ross’s geese too!) taking off from a field. So beautiful!

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

The last stop was a bald eagles’ nest where some brooding is going on. We visited last week and both parents were feeding. The eaglets are too small to see from the road right now. Can’t wait to watch them growing up!

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

 

 

Content Protection by DMCA.com

More Wakarusa Wetlands magic

Little specks of yellow dot the fields and the green is lush and fragrant. Dragonflies are everywhere. Thousands of voices sing. On this morning, I spotted deer, a host of blackbirds, grackles, robins, sparrows, catbirds, indigo buntings, painted buntings, northern cardinals, goldfinches, a huge diversity of frogs, a dickcissel singing loudly, wood ducks, turtles (snappers and painted), geese, great egrets, great blue herons, cattle egrets, little blue herons, mink, muskrats, and the hundreds more. Please help save the Wetlands. Click on pictures to enlarge.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

Content Protection by DMCA.com

Wakarusa wonders

These are from a very good Wakarusa wetlands walk on the morning of  May 22 (sorry about the delay in posting). On this morning, I also visited the “new” area, where I discovered quite a few goslings. Click on pictures to enlarge.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

Content Protection by DMCA.com

Herons galore

I’ve been seeing quite a few herons lately–little blue herons, night herons, and great blue herons. Last year, it seemed I was constantly seeing green herons, but no little blue herons. This year, migration seems a bit off; I am not seeing nearly as many shore birds as I did this time last year. Between climate change, general habitat loss, and BP (and, of course, a host of others), it’s hard to say what might be going on. Click on pictures to enlarge.

 

 

© Chris Taylor

 

© Chris Taylor

 

 

Content Protection by DMCA.com

Wonderful Wakarusa Wetlands

Sadly, my camera is off getting fixed and I have no idea how long it will be away. I’ve been so busy with work these last few weeks that I am way behind on updating the blog. The good news is, I have a nice assortment of pictures to post over the next few days and can’t wait to share them. 🙂 These are from a long walk in the Wetlands on August 16. Click on pictures to enlarge.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

Content Protection by DMCA.com

More Wakarusa Wetlands magic

Click on pictures to enlarge.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

Content Protection by DMCA.com