Baby birds do not always need our help

Baby birds are everywhere right now. Watch out for them. If you find a baby bird, do not assume it needs rescuing. Every year, good intentions separate a great deal of healthy babies from their parents. More often than not, the baby’s parents are nearby and have been feeding her/him. Cornell has some great info on what to do and what not to do.

Operation Wildlife advises if you find a baby bird and he or she is hopping, has most of his or her feathers, and has a short tail, the baby is a fledgling still learning to fly. His or her parents are nearby watching, feeding, and socializing the baby.  I know it can be hard to resist getting involved. They look so vulnerable, but they need to be left alone so their parents can take care of them. If you are not sure if a baby needs help, call your local wildlife rehab. They will be happy to tell you. This is Operation Wildlife’s busiest time of the year.  Donate or volunteer if you can. Join their Facebook page.

Click on pictures to enlarge.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

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