American mink and… who…

I watched this wonderful mink going back and forth between a den and somewhere in the woods. At first I thought he/she was transporting young because she/he made the trip twice. I’m just not sure that is a kit she/he is holding. I do my best to always stay back and try not to disturb anything or anyone. Even though I was hanging back and waiting for her/him to pass by again, minks are just so darn fast that I couldn’t get a great look. Click on pictures to enlarge.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

Fast, fast, and fast.

© Chris Taylor

 

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Herons galore

I’ve been seeing quite a few herons lately–little blue herons, night herons, and great blue herons. Last year, it seemed I was constantly seeing green herons, but no little blue herons. This year, migration seems a bit off; I am not seeing nearly as many shore birds as I did this time last year. Between climate change, general habitat loss, and BP (and, of course, a host of others), it’s hard to say what might be going on. Click on pictures to enlarge.

 

 

© Chris Taylor

 

© Chris Taylor

 

 

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Interesting nest development

I went out to visit the huge eagles’ nest we have been watching for the past few years and discovered it occupied by Canada geese. I’m not sure what happened to the eagles, but if any birders in the area know, please clue me in. I can only see one side of the nest from where I watch, so it could be that there are structural issues I cannot see from where I am. It certainly was surprising to see the geese there. It’s sort of fitting considering how often in the past we would see the eagles come off the nest to harass the geese swimming nearby. 🙂 I do hope the eagles are okay. My understanding is this is one of the oldest, most productive nests in Kansas. Click on pictures to enlarge.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

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Ode to swallows

How I love their acrobatics, the blue gleam of the tree swallows, the amazing mud dwellings of the cliff swallows, and the wonderful expressions of the barn swallows. I can watch them for hours skimming their way across the Wakarusa Wetlands, the Kaw, and Clinton Lake. Click on pictures (tree swallows) to enlarge.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

 

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