Wetlands Residents

It is that time of year again when I have trouble staying at my desk and getting my work done. The number of migrants at the Wakarusa Wetlands has been astounding. And, of course, the year-round residents like the deer and bald eagles are always a pleasure to see. Click on pictures to enlarge.

Pelican and ducks

© Chris Taylor

Great blue heron

© Chris Taylor

Bald eagle

© Chris Taylor

Male deer

© Chris Taylor

Running deer

© Chris Taylor

 

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The wetlands is in the duck and the duck is in the wetlands

On this morning of thunder-snow, I am delighted to post the link to my photo essay, “The Wetlands Is in the Duck and the Duck Is in the Wetlands” at Our Hen House. I am thrilled that they wanted to share this story and amazed by the wonderful work they do. Thank you!

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

 

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Egrets and herons arrive in abundance

Yesterday, I had a wonderful morning walking the Wakarusa Wetlands and was happy to see an egret had arrived. I decided with all this beautiful weather, this week, I work nights. I went back this morning and as I was coming down the path, seven egrets and five great blue herons came sailing in. It was magical! I was also privileged to see a host of little blue herons, green herons, blue and green-winged teal, grebes, and even a white-faced ibis. Click on pictures to enlarge.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

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A foggy morning

After all this rain of late, the Wakarusa Wetlands are indeed wet, and muddy. Some of my favorite walks have been on these chilly spring mornings. Yesterday, it was so foggy when I got there I could not see very far in front of me, so I moved a bit more slowly to make sure I did not surprise any deer or coyotes. Really, I am sure they know I am coming long before I see them, so it is me that gets the surprise. The fog is mysterious, a little scary, and beautiful. Click on pictures to enlarge.

© Chris Taylor

 

© Chris Taylor

 

© Chris Taylor

 

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

 

© Chris Taylor

 

Once the fog cleared, the sun provided some amazing light. A mink came swimming by and a harrier swooped along the top of the tall grass.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

I could not resist stopping by for a few minutes again this morning. Coots were exploring, the Eastern phoebe was guarding the gate, and the turtles were sunning.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

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It’s beginning to look a lot like winter

While I haven’t been out as much as I would like, I love seeing the arrival of our wintering friends. Bald eagles from the north are beginning to arrive and the harriers seem to be swooping low over fields everywhere I look. I saw my first group of common goldeneyes last week (there is definitely nothing common about them; they are beautiful). Young deer are looking much more grownup than a few months ago. Click on pictures to enlarge.

© Chris Taylor

 

© Chris Taylor

 

© Chris Taylor

 

© Chris Taylor

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Wakarusa Wetlands wood ducks and no water

When I visited last week, there was not a lot of water. I so hope that has changed a bit by now. I have my suspicions that water is being diverted from portions of the Wetlands targeted for destruction to build the SLT. I know it has been a dry, hot summer, but it has never looked like this. Click on pictures to enlarge.

© Chris Taylor

This area is usually completely covered by water.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

 

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Wakarusa wonders

These are from a very good Wakarusa wetlands walk on the morning of  May 22 (sorry about the delay in posting). On this morning, I also visited the “new” area, where I discovered quite a few goslings. Click on pictures to enlarge.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

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