A chilly bath

I went to the lake this morning before the sun came up. It was chilly, but really nice to be the only human most of the time. The best part was getting a front row seat to this beautiful red-tailed hawk as she took a bath in the lake. After the bath, she flew up to a tree nearby and hung out as I walked around the shore. Nice morning! Click on pictures to enlarge.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

 

© Chris Taylor

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Pale Male and making change

One of these days when we visit NYC, we will have to make a stop to check out Pale Male’s house on 5th Avenue. In case you have not heard of him, he is a red-tailed hawk who has lived in NYC for just about twenty years. That’s right, a red-tailed hawk thriving in the most urban of urban areas for twenty years—and he is not the only one. I was thinking about him yesterday as I listened to a Bird Note episode about his popularity with not only NYC birders, but New Yorkers in general. It was nice to hear this broadcast after I had been driving around a nearby lake earlier looking at all of the trash left by hunters and thinking, it can’t all be bad news, can it? Despite what we humans throw at them (sometimes, quite literally), wild birds just keep on keeping on. They find a way. I hope that we humans can learn to be better at self-reflection. I hope we can learn to stop and look up, stop and listen, and think about what truly matters. I hope that we can learn to make connections. We can learn that the chickens we eat matter just as much as the wild birds we watch. I hope that we can learn to look at our inconsistencies and truly reflect. We’re not perfect and we do not have to be perfect. We just have to stop and think, reflect, evolve. Imagine a collective reflection. Imagine the kind of change we could make.

© Chris Taylor

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Cooper’s hawk visit

Every once in a while, a Cooper’s hawk comes to visit. While I am sure the little birds would not appreciate this humor, we do, in one way or another, feed everyone at our house. Click on pictures to enlarge.

© Chris Taylor

Nervous robin waits to see if it is safe to take a bath.

© Chris Taylor

Young house sparrows hide in the thicket until parents give the “all clear.”

© Chris Taylor

The titmice don’t mind. Fierce.

© Chris Taylor

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A foggy morning

After all this rain of late, the Wakarusa Wetlands are indeed wet, and muddy. Some of my favorite walks have been on these chilly spring mornings. Yesterday, it was so foggy when I got there I could not see very far in front of me, so I moved a bit more slowly to make sure I did not surprise any deer or coyotes. Really, I am sure they know I am coming long before I see them, so it is me that gets the surprise. The fog is mysterious, a little scary, and beautiful. Click on pictures to enlarge.

© Chris Taylor

 

© Chris Taylor

 

© Chris Taylor

 

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

 

© Chris Taylor

 

Once the fog cleared, the sun provided some amazing light. A mink came swimming by and a harrier swooped along the top of the tall grass.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

I could not resist stopping by for a few minutes again this morning. Coots were exploring, the Eastern phoebe was guarding the gate, and the turtles were sunning.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

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Cooper’s Hawk

Cooper’s hawks and sharp-shinned hawks look very much alike. I’m going to go with Cooper’s on this beauty. She stopped by the yard today to scare off the little birds. Fortunately for the little birds at the feeder, and unfortunately for her, her surprise attack yielded no results. Everyone remained on edge until she left. She flew over to the neighbor’s and watched a bush where cardinals often hang out, but no luck. I felt sorry for her. She looked frustrated and hungry as she took off into the wooded area. Click on pictures to enlarge.

© Chris Taylor

© Chris Taylor

 

© Chris Taylor

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It’s beginning to look a lot like winter

While I haven’t been out as much as I would like, I love seeing the arrival of our wintering friends. Bald eagles from the north are beginning to arrive and the harriers seem to be swooping low over fields everywhere I look. I saw my first group of common goldeneyes last week (there is definitely nothing common about them; they are beautiful). Young deer are looking much more grownup than a few months ago. Click on pictures to enlarge.

© Chris Taylor

 

© Chris Taylor

 

© Chris Taylor

 

© Chris Taylor

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Purple martins v. red-tailed hawk

A red-tailed hawk very stubbornly sat herself on top of this purple martin house. I watched for a while as the purple martins dive-bombed and called her some pretty nasty names.

Purple martins are amazing aerialists. The poor red-tailed hawk was no match for them despite the difference in size.

© Chris Taylor

They won.  She moved on.

© Chris Taylor

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